Posted in podcast

This Is Not Happening – Season 2 is here!

Ep 27 | Sudan Archives | Natural Brown Prom Queen This Is Not Happening – An Album Of The Month Podcast

Guess who's back. Back again. TINH's back. Tell a friend. This month, in Part 1 we go deep on this month's Album of the Month by Sudan Archives. In Part 2 we play 'Spin It or Bin It', where we choose a theme and each bring our choice of tracks. This month the theme is 'Our own personal entrance music'.Part 1 | Album of the Month | Sudan Archives | Natural Brown Prom QueenIt's my (Joey's) choice this month and we've gone with a belter of a sophomore album by Sudan Archives that easily claims the best titled album of the year 'Natural Brown Prom Queen'  If you've not heard it and this inspires you … Go listen to the album – HereGo watch some videos – HereGo buy some merch – here (personally I've got my eye on the 'I just wanna get my titties out' t-shirt – here)As always we kick off with what we expected from the album and what we got. Then we explore favorite tracks, sequencing of the album, why 'OMG Britt' nearly ruined the whole thing for Guy', the creative process of making the album and the influences that we hear.We mention a few things that we'd highly recommend checking out, so here are the links;A great interview with Fader  – 'The World's most confident introvert'Fader interview in Podcast form – hereThe AWESOME Song Exploder episode on 'Selfish Soul' – hereAnd this incredible live performance – WOWZERSPart 2 | Spin It or Bin It | 'Our own personal entrance music'The theme for Spin It or Bin It is a bit different this month. We're choosing our 'Entrance Music' and describing the event or circumstances that we're entering. If that doesn't make too much sense, just listen to the episode!  This month, the 4 tracks were …David chose – Adriano Celentano | L'Unica Chance (plus David's blog post)Joey chose – Joey Valance and Brae (Feat. Logic) | Tanaka 2 (plus Joey's blog post)Guy chose – The Beastie Boys | Sabotage (plus Guy's blog post)Nolan chose – Macklemore and Ryan Lewis | Can't Hold Us (plus Nolan's blog post)Next MonthThe big one! The end of year review. Hold on tight. We count down our 10 favourite albums of the year, featuring lots of moaning about David's album scoring algorithm. We also present our tracks of the year. Can you sum up the year musically in one track? It's a lot tougher than you'd think.Other episodes of the pod and 10 years of the blo
  1. Ep 27 | Sudan Archives | Natural Brown Prom Queen
  2. Ep 26 – Hot Chip – Freakout / Release
  3. Ep 25 – Steve Lacy – Gemini Rights
  4. Ep 24 – Kendrick Lamar – Mr. Morale & the Big Steppers
  5. Ep. 23 – Hurray For The Riff Raff – Life on Earth

How has a year gone by!? But here we are, on Season 2 of This Is Not Happening, an Album of the Month podcast from four of us: GuyJoeyNolan and David. We choose an album: we digest it, we praise it, we question it. And we bring tracks to the table. Every month. And you get to listen. Think of this as a highlights package. 

A year into it, we’ve been lucky enough to cover some amazing albums, right from the start. From RTJ to Arlo ParksGenesis Owusu to Sault, and the Weather Station to Jessie Ware. Rounding it off are Yves TumorPaul McCartneyBicepSt Vincent and Sufjan Stevens. We’ve also covered a review of 2020 in ep6. 

We’ve loved every minute so thanks to everyone that’s listened so far. We hope the next year will be just as enjoyable. We’ve got Skyzoo lined up next before the end of July and after that, Japanese Breakfast. After that? Who knows? That’s the fun. 

For all the albums of the month and all our new tracks, playlists, and chat from the past decade or more head to our blog at www.thisisnothappening.net, which runs alongside the podcast choices and much, much more. Swing by and you’ll hopefully enjoy what we’re talking about and if you like it, we’d love to hear from you on the socials (links below).

This Is Not Happening:
Created by JoeyNolanGuy and David.
Produced and Edited by Guy and Nolan.
Twitter: @thisisnothapng
Instagram: @thisisnothappeningpod
Email: thisisnothappeningpodcast@gmail.com
Reviews: www.ratethispodcast.com/thisisnothappening

Posted in Album of the Month, New Albums

AOTM June: Skyzoo – All the Brilliant Things

At best we will choose a hip hop album for our album of the month yearly, and it’s for good reason. Hip Hop is at times hard to approach, and hard to find time to listen to away from your kids as 4 middle aged fathers.

For me there’s more of an issue. I remember when I first heard the likes of Nas, Common (Sence) and Rakim. Each song was a lyric twisting journey into their world. As time passes I find it harder to find MC’s that blow me away with their word play. I often wonder is why latter generations of MC’s are less focussed on this? Does it matter anymore? The genre of Hip Hop is a bit confusing these days. I find it hard to understand how much of the hip hop that ‘the kids’ like these days is listenable. Misogyny, violence and criminality seem to be more prevalent than ever.

I came across Skyzoo in 2014 through his collaboration with his New York collaborator weight Torae. Instantly I was a fan. His word play and commentary put him amongst the hip hop heavy weights that I love. The more you listen to his lyrics the more layers to his lyrics you discover. Growing up in Brooklyn in the 90’s made him a student of some of the greats such as Biggie to Jay-Z and it shows. He has an uncanny ability to bring you into his world and keep you there. I was hooked and instantly delved into previous releases which included a heralded mixtape produced by 9th Wonder, followed by his debut album on 9th’s Jamal records (home of Rapsody amongst others) and later releases on two of my favourite labels; Duck Down Records and Mello Music.

You can find music from Skyzoo over the last 20 years, but the last 10 have seen him at his best. Releasing at least an album a year, it’s hard to find any weak piece of work among them. It’s understandable why he’s become one of the most respected underground MC’s around the globe. From working with boom bap super producer Apollo Brown to hip hop general Pete Rock, Skyzoo’s output is diverse and more-ish.

So this brings us to his latest effort, ‘All the Brilliant Things’. Like last month’s St Vincent album, it comes with a theme. This is an album about the gentrification of Brooklyn. Not only highlighting the change but also the world Skyzoo has grown up in, why he loves it, the memories, the stories and the dreams.

My notes for this album have been extensive. I was lost for words, how do you encapsulate the plethora of Skyzoo and what he does to this album? Lucky I read an interview with him where he described it perfectly. He said ‘My music has always been a combination of a few things: storytelling, motive, and intention’. That narrative rings true with another Brooklyn native that I love, Spike Lee. In fact there are cross overs throughout between the two. Perhaps I’ve seen too many Spike Lee movies.

I love hip hop albums that set the scene for the album on the first track and ‘Free Jewellery’ does it to a tee. Skyzoo dives in from the start. Weaving, layering, and provoking thoughts with each line. Amongst the journey he dips his toes into the irony of the critic’s interpretations his world whilst at the same time gentrifying it themselves.

‘So don’t mistake me, yo, I don’t do this for Complex

Nor a Pitchfork or any other facade

Where the culture is determined while chugging a PBR

And telling you how to represent all of the shit that you made

While they move in your building with their roommates’

‘Culture-ish’ is another remarkable track. Full of recollections…

‘I was buying art, my friends was buying dope.

I went and made friends with rappers that was buying both’

….was the line that caught my ears, but every line in the song is spotless. I’ve spent so much time getting my head around the layers of lyrics. He reminds me of Jay-Z on Reasonable Doubt. From Brooklyn or not, you’re pulled into his world (then and now) as you sit ring side in Skyzoo’s world in Brooklyn.

There are lyrics throughout outlining changing worlds. In line with the theme, but not blatantly. ‘The Scrimmage’ looks into money and how it’s made, old and new and it’s ruthlessness. I love the track lyrically, but when the track finishes with a clip of two people talking about being removed from their neighbourhood, it makes you listen again…. Because he was talking about it the whole time.

Hip Hop was born in the Bronx, but since its inception the New York boroughs all battled to own the top spot. Brooklyn arguably has a strong claim for the top spot. Jay-Z, Biggie, Sean Price, Yasin Bey (Mos Def), the list goes on. That mixed with exceptional graffiti artists and their influence on me is the reason Brooklyn has always facinated me. That fascination of Brooklyn for me and so many others may just kill where that fascination comes from; it’s soul. This album concept is well overdue.  ‘Bed-Stuy Is Burning’ is not only the stand out track on the album but one of the best hip hop songs that has been released in recent memory as Skyzoo delves into the world he loves and how it’s crumbling at his feet.

‘To whom it may concern, don’t let this happen to you

True to what you heard, they want this back like a loop

They gave you a curb and kept you back on the stoop

And now what they prefer is to help you pack when you move’

There are few reviews on this album, but many podcast interviews with Skyzoo. From a fan point of view some say it’s his best lyrically rounded album while some say it’s too long and the beats could be better on many tracks. I don’t disagree with either to a point. Personally I think that this is an album that when digested the four of us will use as a reference point for many albums in the future as this in its’ bones has the feels. The song by song justification and the ability to continually discover with each listen. Its’ long term importance to all of us is unseen but on different levels this album is important to all four of us and is worth everyone digesting. I’ve stayed in New York three times for work, once in Brooklyn. I’ll take Brooklyn and day of the week. It’s mind kind of place. It’s cool. Like east London is cool. The hipsters came in and made it cool for the middle classes. But at what cost? This album is about that cost. About a changing neighbourhood. This message transcends globally.

One of most common narratives on the blog and on the podcast is album length. ‘All the Brilliant Things’ is 14 songs long and just over 55 minutes which is standard for a hip hop album. At first I considered that the album could drop the middle three or fours tracks, but lyrically they’re growers and some of the best on the album.

The more I listen to this album the more I discover. Will it be perfect to the lesser hip hop fans? I’m not sure. I love it because it’s out and out hip hop that also delivers on a social commentary that we should all digest.

Posted in podcast

Podcast Episode 12 – St Vincent – Daddy’s Home

Ep 27 | Sudan Archives | Natural Brown Prom Queen This Is Not Happening – An Album Of The Month Podcast

Guess who's back. Back again. TINH's back. Tell a friend. This month, in Part 1 we go deep on this month's Album of the Month by Sudan Archives. In Part 2 we play 'Spin It or Bin It', where we choose a theme and each bring our choice of tracks. This month the theme is 'Our own personal entrance music'.Part 1 | Album of the Month | Sudan Archives | Natural Brown Prom QueenIt's my (Joey's) choice this month and we've gone with a belter of a sophomore album by Sudan Archives that easily claims the best titled album of the year 'Natural Brown Prom Queen'  If you've not heard it and this inspires you … Go listen to the album – HereGo watch some videos – HereGo buy some merch – here (personally I've got my eye on the 'I just wanna get my titties out' t-shirt – here)As always we kick off with what we expected from the album and what we got. Then we explore favorite tracks, sequencing of the album, why 'OMG Britt' nearly ruined the whole thing for Guy', the creative process of making the album and the influences that we hear.We mention a few things that we'd highly recommend checking out, so here are the links;A great interview with Fader  – 'The World's most confident introvert'Fader interview in Podcast form – hereThe AWESOME Song Exploder episode on 'Selfish Soul' – hereAnd this incredible live performance – WOWZERSPart 2 | Spin It or Bin It | 'Our own personal entrance music'The theme for Spin It or Bin It is a bit different this month. We're choosing our 'Entrance Music' and describing the event or circumstances that we're entering. If that doesn't make too much sense, just listen to the episode!  This month, the 4 tracks were …David chose – Adriano Celentano | L'Unica Chance (plus David's blog post)Joey chose – Joey Valance and Brae (Feat. Logic) | Tanaka 2 (plus Joey's blog post)Guy chose – The Beastie Boys | Sabotage (plus Guy's blog post)Nolan chose – Macklemore and Ryan Lewis | Can't Hold Us (plus Nolan's blog post)Next MonthThe big one! The end of year review. Hold on tight. We count down our 10 favourite albums of the year, featuring lots of moaning about David's album scoring algorithm. We also present our tracks of the year. Can you sum up the year musically in one track? It's a lot tougher than you'd think.Other episodes of the pod and 10 years of the blo
  1. Ep 27 | Sudan Archives | Natural Brown Prom Queen
  2. Ep 26 – Hot Chip – Freakout / Release
  3. Ep 25 – Steve Lacy – Gemini Rights
  4. Ep 24 – Kendrick Lamar – Mr. Morale & the Big Steppers
  5. Ep. 23 – Hurray For The Riff Raff – Life on Earth

Episode 12 of This Is Not Happening strides from Genesis Owusu‘s Smiling With No Teeth to the much-anticipated new album from St VincentDaddy’s Home. The New York art-rock darling has embraced the underbelly of the 1970s with a new persona and some eye-catching tracks. Megafan David tries to convince us why we should all love it. It’s definitely a tug of war for an album that’s found reactions at both extremes. We also put together a playlist of music that makes us lean to Annie Clark.

In the second half of the episode, we set the seemingly impossible task of convincing each other to like a song from artists that they hate. What were we thinking?! Our longlist is here, see what we thought of the picks:

David via Joey – Manic Street Preachers – You’re Tender And You’re Tired
Guy  via Nolan – The Weeknd – High For This
Nolan via David – Muse – Falling Down
Joey via Guy – Arcade Fire – Intervention

Episode #13 takes us into series 2 of the podcast, and sees Nolan bring some hip-hop to the table with Skyzoo‘s new album All The Brilliant Things. as the celebrated New Yorker takes us into his world.  Skyzoo will be coming to you before the end of July.

June’s album of the month and all our new tracks, playlists, and chat from the past decade or more can be found on our blog at www.thisisnothappening.net, which runs alongside the podcast choices and much, much more. Swing by and you’ll hopefully enjoy what we’re talking about and if you like it, we’d love to hear from you on the socials (links below).

This Is Not Happening:
Created by JoeyNolanGuy and David.
Produced and Edited by Guy and Nolan.
Twitter: @thisisnothapng
Instagram: @thisisnothappeningpod
Email: thisisnothappeningpodcast@gmail.com
Reviews: www.ratethispodcast.com/thisisnothappening

Posted in Album of the Month, New Albums, New Tunes

JUNE AOTM: Daddy’s Home – St Vincent

St Vincent aka Annie Clark, has been a major part of my musical landscape for the last decade. I latched on to her first album, Marry Me, in 2007, and immediately loved its slightly wonky sensibilities wrapped up in brilliant songs, and it’s been a mostly highly rewarding experience seeing her career and her ambitions grow with every album. She’s now pretty close to being a bonafide star – certainly an indie star anyway – and I saw that first hand as she effortlessly and brilliantly headlined the End of the Road festival a couple of years back. My wife, Caroline, absolutely adores her too – maybe even more than me – so she’s an artist who has been played to death in our house over the years.

But I’ve long ago come to realise that she’s a Marmite artist. Many friends to whom I’ve recommended her have come back with a blank look on their faces – they don’t ‘get’ her at all. I do kind of understand it – her sound can be very angular and jagged, and she wields her incredible guitar playing (more on that later) like a weapon. She’s wilfully, unapologetically arty, and it can often feel like she’s hiding herself behind a series of different personas. She can make obtuse decisions – like starting an album as brilliant as Strange Mercy with a track as hard to listen to as Chloe in the Afternoon. She seems to delight in setting fire to her previous incarnation, and I can see that might feel frustrating to an artist you’re trying to invest. Me, I fucking love her. I love trying to find the real Annie hiding, sometimes in plain sight, in her songs. I love the way she paints a picture with a song. Just try and listen to Year of the Tiger (also on Strange Mercy). It’s like a little movie.

Funnily enough, me and Annie’s first real musical differences came on her biggest album to date, the behemoth that was Masseduction. Recorded with hot shot producer Jack Antonoff, he of Lorde, Lana Del Rey and Taylor Swift album fame, it was a radical departure to the angular, electronic indie rock of her previous work. It was unapologetically pop with a capital P, with more nods to Kylie and Robyn than her indie peers. It was a critical and sales hit, along with single Los Ageless, and opened her up to a new audience (and led to those festival headlining moments). Friends who don’t like Annie C have complained they find her a bit cold. I never felt that at all until Masseduction. It just didn’t connect with me. It felt a little calculated, and it was – well, just a lot less original than anything she’d done until that point. She was trampling on much more familiar territory and I just couldn’t get as excited.

So when I heard that Annie was channeling 70s rock and Bowie on the new album, then frankly, I was chomping at the bit. I wanted to hear something more organic, something more emotionally connected. And I wanted to hear that incredible guitar back up high in the mix. We should mention her guitar playing for a minute. If you haven’t seen her life, it’s hard to quite grasp how good she is. She’s Prince-level good. She’s UNBELIEVABLE. I think she’s probably the most talented guitar player of her generation.

Pay Your Way in Pain did nothing to dampen my excitement. What a fucking song it is. And what an opening track it is on the album. It’s a proper rock song, and it sets up that mixture of emotional pain and retro irony quite beautifully. And then the came the new look for the record. Blonde wig, leather jacket. All very playful, all very Annie Clark. But also this extraordinary backstory about her father’s incarceration (which by the way she has NEVER mentioned up until this point!). Daddy’s Home? Nudge nudge wink wink. And then came the 5 star reviews, and lots of them.

So what did I feel when I started to listen to the whole album. Initially, I was just so, so happy. I loved it almost immediately. It was exactly what I was hoping for. Perhaps more downbeat and slow than I was expecting, but it seemed to wear its heart on its sleeve as much as you could ever hope from a musician who’s often been careful to cover her tracks.

The big surprise was that this was also made with Jack Antonoff. Who’d have thought it? In fact, the two of them recorded quite a lot of the album between them. Did Antonoff allow Clark to find that musical voice she was looking for, did he just give her that freedom? Or was there still something a little bit calculated about it? That was the only nagging thing I had in my head now and again as I listened.

And then…the backlash started. I must say, in the interests of balance, that it’s hardly that much of a backlash – as of today, it still has a whopping 86 on Metacritic. But there were a couple of extraordinary reviews – one from Pitchfork that seemed to damn it with faint praise, as well a much more damning piece on Slate that argued that this was her worst album, comparing her unfavourably to fellow pop chameleons Prince and Bowie. Both of those articles contain some pretty unbelievable accusations (Pitchfork – it’s racially insensitive for St V to mention Nina Simone alongside white artists. Slate – she’s actually never been that good a lyricist. That latter one made me laugh out loud. ARE YOU FUCKING JOKING ME, MATE?).

The whiff of double standards on female musicians, particularly singular artists with their own vision, hangs heavy in the air. And I don’t think that for a second that Annie Clark is asking to be compared to Prince or Bowie. But let’s leave some of the stupidity of some of the worst comments, and ask the tricky question – have they got a point? Is this album the real deal, or is it a kind of well-executed pastiche of a kind of mythical musical past? I suspect that as a collective, we’re going to end up on different sides of that question. I can’t wait for the pod!

My own experience is this. There are a few obvious big, brilliant belters – Pay Your Way, Down, Melting of the Sun. Down might be my favourite song on the album. And some have called The Melting of the Sun a bit clunky. I think it’s utterly glorious – a straight down the line love letter to those who’ve paved the way for her. And the analogy of the patriarchy melting like the sun is delicious.

But actually, on repeat listening, it’s not the 70s pastiche, or the sitar playing (though I LOVE the sitar playing!) or the Bowie schtick that’s sticking with me. It’s the songwriting. And it’s the smaller songs that have come to be amongst my favourites. Down and Out Downtown is just beautiful, At The Holiday Party is sad and compassionate, Somebody Like Me feels like Annie reckoning with herself and her personas in a really moving way. And right in the centre, the extraordinary Live in the Dream. Yes, it owes a hell of debt to Pink Floyd, and also to Bowie’s Diamond Dogs in lyrical theme, but I just can’t get enough of it. I’ve listened to that one track to death and I find it genuinely moving.

There are odd things about the album that jar a little. I think the sequencing is odd – I’d have put Live in the Dream later in the album, maybe pulled Down further up. For me, the title track, Daddy’s Home, is the album’s weak spot, and it’s a shame it’s sequenced as Track 3. I think this the one time that the nudge-nudge sexy/existential pain 70s vibe just doesn’t quite work. She’s hiding behind the song and it’s not telling us anything about the real story of her father’s incarceration. It feels a little cheap to use that as a sell. That’s a shame.

But the rest of the album? I’m not seeing a persona. I’m seeing a real human being singing about real human things – disappointment, love, dead-end careers, loneliness, the death of a friend. The things that Annie Clark’s detractors accuse her of – being angular, being difficult, hiding behind a persona – I honestly don’t think that’s true of this album, title track aside. In the end, the songs speak loud and clear. And if you’ll excuse me now, I’m just going to play it again…